7-panel STI test

7-panel STI test

£59 + Free Shipping  Order Now

  • Only £59.00 for confidential results in 2 working days
  • Tests for 7 STIs: Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Trichomoniasis, Ureaplasma parvum (UTI) and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UTI)
  • All tests performed at our UK laboratory – so your samples won’t be sent abroad
  • Adheres to BASHH, FSHR and MHRA guidelines for sexual health testing
  • Test kit sent out in discreet, plain packaging
  • Suitable for people with or without symptoms
  • Only a vaginal swab or urine sample required
All major debit and credit cards accepted, or…
Pay in 3 interest-free payments using PayPal. Learn more

Order Now

You must be at least 16 years of age to purchase a home STI test kit from AlphaBiolabs.

If you are experiencing symptoms causing severe pain and discomfort or require face-to-face examination, we advise you to contact your GP or local sexual health clinic as soon as possible.

Discreet, reliable STI testing from our award-winning laboratory

Why choose an at-home Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) test?

Whether you are experiencing symptoms that indicate you could have an STI, or do not have symptoms and just want a test to put your mind at rest, an at-home STI (previously referred to as STD) test from AlphaBiolabs is a simple, accurate way of finding out whether you have contracted an infection from sexual intercourse.

There are many reasons why you might want an STI test including:

  • You are experiencing symptoms e.g. unusual discharge, itching, burning or irritation, and/or more frequent urination
  • You engage in unprotected sex (or have engaged in unprotected sex in the past)
  • You and/or your partner(s) have multiple sexual partners
  • You and/or your partner(s) engage in drug use before/during sex
  • You’ve met someone new and want to be sure you’re both healthy before beginning a physical relationship

With a simple vaginal swab (women) or a urine sample (men), our UK testing laboratory can give you much-needed insight into your sexual health.

Our 7-panel STI test can be used to detect seven pathogens: Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Trichomoniasis, Ureaplasma parvum (UTI) and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UTI).

Your test kit will contain everything you need to collect your samples and return them to our UK laboratory.

Once we receive your samples, your results will be emailed to you in just 2 working days, using the email address you supply when registering your test.

Order your at-home 7-panel STI test online now or by calling our friendly and discreet Customer Services team on 0333 600 1300.

Order Now

How does the STI test kit work?

Order your collection kit

Order your test kit and register online

Collect your sample

Collect your sample

Post back to our UK laboratory

Post back to our UK laboratory

Receive your results by email

Receive your confidential results by email

When is the best time to take an at-home STI test?

We recommend that you take an STI test no sooner than two weeks after having unprotected sex.

If you collect your sample too soon, the results of your test may not be as accurate.

This is because each STI has a different window period – the time it takes from when you were first infected to when an STI can be detected in your sample – meaning that an infection may not be detected if a test is done too early.

However, if you have started to experience symptoms, you can test immediately.

If you have no symptoms, you should take the test two weeks after having sex.

You can take our 7-panel STI test whether you are symptomatic (experiencing symptoms) or asymptomatic (not experiencing symptoms).

Order a 7-panel STI test

Sample collection

AlphaBiolabs provides two sample collection options for the 7-panel STI test:

  • Vaginal swab – for customers with female genitalia
  • Urine sample – for customers with male genitalia

When you receive your sample collection kit, follow the enclosed instructions to take your vaginal swab or urine sample.

Once you have collected your sample, carefully package the vaginal swab or urine sample pot in the protective packaging, place into the pre-paid tracked return polythene envelope and return to our UK laboratory.

Although both our vaginal swab and urine sample pots are suitable for women ordering an STI test, we do recommend that people with female genitalia choose a vaginal swab for the most accurate result.

If you are a female who would like to submit a urine sample for testing, please contact our Customer Services team who will be able to assist you (call 0333 600 1300 or email info@alphabiolabs.com)

Order a 7-panel STI test now
Explore our full range of STI/STD tests

Results emailed to you in just 2 days

Which infections can be detected using the 7-panel STI test?

Our 7-panel STI test can be used to detect the following pathogens, using a vaginal swab or a urine sample:

  • Chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis)
  • Gonorrhoea (Neisseria gonorrhoea)
  • Mycoplasma genitalium
  • Mycoplasma hominis
  • Trichomoniasis (Trichomonas vaginalis)
  • Ureaplasma parvum (urinary tract infection/UTI)
  • Ureaplasma urealyticum (urinary tract infection/UTI)

Please note that both men and women can be affected by all seven of these pathogens, including the UTIs ureaplasma parvum and ureaplasma urealyticum.

How accurate is the 7-panel STI test?

Our 7-panel STI test meets the highest possible quality standard for STI testing, including laboratory testing methods and sample types used for testing.

Better still, all our STI/STD tests have been developed in accordance with stringent guidelines as set by the British Association for Sexual Health & HIV (BASHH), Faculty of Sexual Reproductive Health (FSHR) and the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Learn more: Why is compliance with guidelines so important for STI testing?

What does the STI test kit include?

The urine STI kit includes:

  • Sample collection kit box
  • Instruction leaflet 
  • Biohazard bag containing an absorbent pad
  • Pre-paid tracked return polythene envelope
  • Sterile urine collection tube with lid, and funnel

The vaginal swab STI kit includes:

  • Sample collection kit box
  • Instruction leaflet 
  • Biohazard bag containing an absorbent pad
  • Pre-paid tracked return polythene envelope
  • Sterile vaginal swab in a tube
Order a 7-panel STI test

Looking for a different test? Explore our full range of STI/STD tests now

Detects the most common STIs, even when you do not have symptoms

Frequently Asked Questions

There are lots of instances when you should consider taking an STI (previously referred to as STD) test both for your own peace of mind, and for the wellbeing of your partner(s).

Examples include:

  • You have symptoms that could mean you have an STI
  • You engage in unprotected sex (or have engaged in unprotected sex in the past) 
  • You and/or your partner have multiple sexual partners
  • You and/or your partner(s) engage in drug use before/during sex
  • You’ve met someone new and want to be sure you’re both healthy before beginning a physical relationship

Whatever your situation, an STI test can help put your mind at rest or enable you to seek the correct treatment if a pathogen is detected within your sample.

If you’ve decided to take an STI test, we would advise that your current partner and any other partners with whom you’ve had a sexual relationship in the past six months be tested as well.

This can reduce the risk of reinfection if either you or your partner has an STI you were unaware of; it can also help prevent the spread of STIs to other people.

For more information on symptoms and complications see ‘What are the symptoms of the STIs included in the 7-panel STI test?’

If you’re sexually active, taking an STI test is the most reliable way of making sure you’re staying safe. It also helps reduce the risk of you passing an STI onto someone else.

Many people with an STI (formerly known as STD) will not experience symptoms, so regular sexual health checks are important. If left untreated some STIs can cause long-lasting or permanent damage to your health (e.g. infertility and chronic pain).

General guidance

If you are sexually active, a comprehensive sexual health check is recommended once a year, and should include a multi-panel test such as our 7-panel STI test, which tests for some of the most common STIs in the UK, and at least one blood test, such as our:

If you are in a high-risk category and/or engage in frequent sexual activity with multiple partners, you may want to consider having a comprehensive sexual health check every 3-6 months.

For further advice and guidance, visit https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/

How often you get tested and which STIs (previously called STDs) you are tested for can depend on your age, gender, risk factors, and how sexually active you are.

If you’re a man who’s sexually active…

It is recommended that you get an STI test annually. However, you may want to consider having a test every three- to- six- months if you are having regular unprotected sex with new or casual partners.

If you’re a woman who’s sexually active…

  • It is recommended that you get an STI test annually. However, you may want to consider having a test every three- to- six- months if you are having regular unprotected sex with new or casual partners.
  • If you are pregnant, it is recommended that you get tested for HIV and syphilis. Women who are high risk may also consider being tested for chlamydia and gonorrhoea.

AlphaBiolabs offers a range of STI tests to help you keep your sexual health in check, including:

If you are having regular unprotected sex – especially if you and/or your partner have multiple sexual partners – it is recommended that you have a comprehensive sexual health test at least once a year.

This should include a multi-panel test such as our  7-panel STI test, which tests for some of the most common STIs in the UK, and at least one blood test, such as our:

If you are in a high-risk category and/or engage in frequent sexual activity with multiple partners, you may want to consider having a comprehensive sexual health check every 3-6 months.

Chlamydia & Gonorrhoea test is ideally suited to individuals who have had a comprehensive sexual health check in the previous 12 months and simply want to test more regularly for these most common (and often symptomless) infections.

For more information on symptoms and complications see ‘What are the symptoms of the STIs included in the 7-panel STI test?’

Our STI (STD) testing is 100% accurate and reliable based on the samples we receive at our laboratory.  

Our UKAS-accredited laboratory works to strict, government enforced protocols to ensure your results are as accurate as possible.

Unlike many other online STI testing providers, our range of STI/STD tests has been developed in accordance with stringent guidelines as set by the British Association for Sexual Health & HIV (BASHH)Faculty of Sexual Reproductive Health (FSHR) and the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

If you have any concerns about the reliability of your results, we would be happy to talk to you and answer any questions you might have.

For further guidance, we recommend making an appointment with your GP or visiting your nearest sexual health clinic.

You can also learn more about STIs/STDs by visiting https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/.

Once you have ordered your test, we will dispatch your test kit and also send you an email with a link to register your test online.

Please follow this link to complete your registration form online, ensuring that all your personal details are correct before collecting your samples.

If you have not received the email by the time you receive your test kit, please contact us on 0333 600 1300 or email health@alphabiolabs.com for assistance.

IMPORTANT: You MUST register your test online before returning your samples to our laboratory.

We will not be able to start the testing process until you have registered your test.

AlphaBiolabs offers two types of sample collection for the 7-panel STI test: a vaginal swab or a urine sample.

Both our vaginal swabs and our urine sample pots are suitable for women ordering an STI test. However, we recommend a vaginal swab for women where possible, for a more accurate result.

If you are a female who would prefer to submit a urine sample for testing, please contact our Customer Services team who will be able to help.

If you are a homosexual man, you will need to use our urine sample pot. However, other STI (STD) testing providers may also recommend a rectal swab, depending on your personal circumstances.

AlphaBiolabs does not currently offer rectal STI testing. If you require more options for STI testing, we recommend speaking to your GP or consulting your local sexual health clinic for further information.

The most accurate way to detect STIs (previously called STDs) is to collect samples from the area that is most likely to have been exposed to infection during sexual contact.

When testing women, we ask that a sample is provided from the vagina using a vaginal swab (like a cotton bud), for the most conclusive result. This is because swabs taken from inside the vagina are likely to have the highest concentration of the pathogens we are testing for in the laboratory.

Although females can submit a urine sample for testing, a urine test is not as accurate for people with female genitalia. This is because the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body) is not the main area of exposure for females when an STI is contracted during sexual intercourse.

A vaginal swab is a quick and painless way of collecting your sample for the purpose of STI testing.

When testing men, the highest concentration of a pathogen can be found within the urinary tract (urethra) inside the penis.

When a man passes urine, traces of infectious organisms/bacteria are carried out of the body and can be detected within the urine sample when it is analysed at the laboratory.

If you are providing a urine sample, it is important that you do not urinate for at least one hour prior to collecting your sample as this could wash away pathogens and make the sample less concentrated, affecting the results of the test.

If a pathogen is present, it will be detectable in the vaginal swab or urine sample using laboratory analysis. The sample is analysed using a method known as PCR testing to detect the presence of any pathogens.

Please note that AlphaBiolabs does not currently offer STI testing using oral or anal swabs.

For further advice and guidance, visit https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/

Many people with STI infections will not experience any symptoms at all, meaning that regular STI testing is important.

Our 7-panel STI test can detect seven STI (formerly known as STD) pathogens: chlamydia trachomatis, mycoplasma genitalium, mycoplasma hominis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, trichomonas vaginalis, ureaplasma parvum and ureaplasma urealyticum.

It is important to note that both women and men can be affected by all seven of these pathogens including ureaplasma parvum and ureaplasma urealyticum (both UTIs).

These pathogens all present similar symptoms, so it is beneficial to test for all of them to identify which STI you might have. You have the option to request either a vaginal swab test kit (females) or a urine sample test kit (males) when placing your order.

Below is an overview of some of the most common symptoms experienced by men and women for each of the seven pathogens included in an AlphaBiolabs 7-panel STI test, along with possible complications if left untreated:

MEN

STI/UTI SYMPTOMS POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia)
  • Small amounts of clear or cloudy discharge from the tip of your penis
  • Painful urination
  • Burning and itching around the opening of your penis
  • Pain and swelling around your testicles
  • An infection of the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm away from the testes)
  • Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum)
Neisseria gonorrhoea (gonorrhoea)
  • Burning when you urinate
  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • White, yellow, or green discharge from your penis
  • Increased chance of getting HIV
  • Infection in other parts of your body like your skin or joints
  • Infertility
Trichomonas vaginalis
  • Itching or irritation inside the penis
  • A thin white discharge from the penis
  • Pain when you urinate or have sex
  • The need to urinate more often
  • Easier to get infected with HIV
  • Easier to pass the HIV virus on to a sexual partner
Mycoplasma genitalium
  • Urethritis – a swelling of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body)
  • Stinging or burning when you urinate
  • Discharge from the penis
  • Inflammation of the foreskin and penis
  • Sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA)
  • Epididymo-orchitis – a painful swelling and infection of the testicle (testis), and a tube called the epididymis
  • If someone has other STIs like HIV, having mycoplasma genitalium as well makes them more likely to pass on those infections
Mycoplasma hominis
  • Discharge from the penis (often foul smelling)
  • A burning sensation during urination
  • Inflammation of the kidneys (pyelonephritis)
  • Infertility
  • Sepsis
  • Increased chance of getting HIV
Ureaplasma urealyticum and ureaplasma parvum (UTIs)
  • Urethritis – a swelling of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body)
  • Stinging or burning when you urinate
  • Discharge from the penis
  • Inflammation of the foreskin and penis

Ureaplasma urealyticum:

  • Impacts sperm formation (reducing fertility)
  • Increased chance of getting HIV

Ureaplasma parvum:

  • Urethritis – a swelling of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body)
  • Non-specific micturition syndrome
  • Infertility

Both ureaplasmas can also increase your risk of developing kidney stones.

WOMEN

STI/UTI SYMPTOMS POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia)
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge that may have an odour
  • Bleeding between periods
  • Painful periods
  • Abdominal pain with fever
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Itching or burning in or around your vagina
  • Pain when you urinate
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease, which can damage your fallopian tubes (the tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus) leading to infertility
  • Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (when the fertilised egg implants and develops outside your uterus)
  • Premature births
  • If mothers pass the infection to their children during childbirth, the newborn could have eye infections, blindness, or pneumonia
Neisseria gonorrhoea (gonorrhoea)
  • Burning or pain when you urinate
  • Bleeding between periods
  • More vaginal discharge than is typical
  • Pain in your belly
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Increased chance of getting HIV
  • Infection in other parts of your body like your skin or joints
  • Infertility
Trichomonas vaginalis
  • Vaginal fluid that smells bad and is greenish or yellowish
  • Genital itching, burning, redness, or soreness
  • Pain when you urinate or have sex
  • The need to urinate more often
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Easier to get infected with HIV
  • Easier to pass the HIV virus on to a sexual partner
Mycoplasma genitalium
  • Pain during sex
  • Bleeding from the vagina after sex
  • Discharge from the vagina
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease in women, which can damage your fallopian tubes (the tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus) leading to infertility
  • Sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA)
  • If someone has other STIs like HIV, having mycoplasma genitalium as well makes them more likely to pass on those infections
Mycoplasma hominis
  • Discharge from the vagina
  • Pain or burning feeling during urination
  • Continuous pain during sex
  • Vaginal itching
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease in women, which can damage your fallopian tubes (the tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus) leading to infertility
  • Can cause a fever and infection in your newborn baby
Ureaplasma urealyticum and ureaplasma parvum (UTIs)
  • It hurts when you urinate
  • Belly pain
  • Pain, odour, or discharge from the vagina
  • Swelling at the opening of the urethra
  • Discharge from the urethra

During pregnancy, the bacteria can lead to infections in both the mother and the baby. Problems in newborn babies can include:

  • Low birth weight
  • Pneumonia
  • Septicaemia (bacteria in the blood)

MEN

Chalmydia trachomatis (chlamydia)
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Small amounts of clear or cloudy discharge from the tip of your penis
  • Painful urination
  • Burning and itching around the opening of your penis
  • Pain and swelling around your testicles
  • An infection of the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm away from the testes)
  • Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum)
Neisseria gonorrhoea (gonorrhoea)
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Burning when you urinate
  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • White, yellow, or green discharge from your penis
  • Increased chance of getting HIV
  • Infection in other parts of your body like your skin or joints
  • Infertility
Trichomonas vaginalis
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Itching or irritation inside the penis
  • A thin white discharge from the penis
  • Pain when you urinate or have sex
  • The need to urinate more often
  • Easier to get infected with HIV
  • Easier to pass the HIV virus on to a sexual partner
Mycoplasma genitalium
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Urethritis – a swelling of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body)
  • Stinging or burning when you urinate
  • Discharge from the penis
  • Inflammation of the foreskin and penis
  • Sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA)
  • Epididymo-orchitis – a painful swelling and infection of the testicle (testis), and a tube called the epididymis
  • If someone has other STIs like HIV, having mycoplasma genitalium as well makes them more likely to pass on those infections
Mycoplasma hominis
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Discharge from the penis (often foul smelling)
  • A burning sensation during urination
  • Inflammation of the kidneys (pyelonephritis)
  • Infertility
  • Sepsis
  • Increased chance of getting HIV
Ureaplasma urealyticum and ureaplasma parvum (UTIs)
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Urethritis – a swelling of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body)
  • Stinging or burning when you urinate
  • Discharge from the penis
  • Inflammation of the foreskin and penis

Ureaplasma urealyticum:

  • Impacts sperm formation (reducing fertility)
  • Increased chance of getting HIV

Ureaplasma parvum:

  • Urethritis – a swelling of the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body)
  • Non-specific micturition syndrome
  • Infertility

Both ureaplasmas can also increase your risk of developing kidney stones.

WOMEN

Chalmydia trachomatis (chlamydia)
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge that may have an odour
  • Bleeding between periods
  • Painful periods
  • Abdominal pain with fever
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Itching or burning in or around your vagina
  • Pain when you urinate
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease, which can damage your fallopian tubes (the tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus) leading to infertility
  • Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (when the fertilised egg implants and develops outside your uterus)
  • Premature births
  • If mothers pass the infection to their children during childbirth, the newborn could have eye infections, blindness, or pneumonia
Neisseria gonorrhoea (gonorrhoea)
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Burning or pain when you urinate
  • Bleeding between periods
  • More vaginal discharge than is typical
  • Pain in your belly
  • Pain when you have sex
  • Increased chance of getting HIV
  • Infection in other parts of your body like your skin or joints
  • Infertility
Trichomonas vaginalis
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Vaginal fluid that smells bad and is greenish or yellowish
  • Genital itching, burning, redness, or soreness
  • Pain when you urinate or have sex
  • The need to urinate more often
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Easier to get infected with HIV
  • Easier to pass the HIV virus on to a sexual partner
Mycoplasma genitalium
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Pain during sex
  • Bleeding from the vagina after sex
  • Discharge from the vagina
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease in women, which can damage your fallopian tubes (the tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus) leading to infertility
  • Sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA)
  • If someone has other STIs like HIV, having mycoplasma genitalium as well makes them more likely to pass on those infections
Mycoplasma hominis
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • Discharge from the vagina
  • Pain or burning feeling during urination
  • Continuous pain during sex
  • Vaginal itching
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease in women, which can damage your fallopian tubes (the tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus) leading to infertility
  • Can cause a fever and infection in your newborn baby
Ureaplasma urealyticum and ureaplasma parvum (UTIs)
Symptoms Possible Complications
  • It hurts when you urinate
  • Belly pain
  • Pain, odour, or discharge from the vagina
  • Swelling at the opening of the urethra
  • Discharge from the urethra

During pregnancy, the bacteria can lead to infections in both the mother and the baby. Problems in newborn babies can include:

  • Low birth weight
  • Pneumonia
  • Septicaemia (bacteria in the blood)

Your test results will tell you whether you had a detectable infection at the time your sample was collected.

If a pathogen is Detected, this means that you had an infection when you collected your sample for testing.

If you receive a Detected result, you MUST contact your GP or local healthcare provider to seek treatment for the infection. Some GPs or clinics will also recommend further testing to determine which strain of the pathogen is present, so that you can receive the correct medical treatment.

If a pathogen is Not detected, this means that an infection was not present in the sample at the time of collection.

If you receive a Not detected result but believe that you have been exposed to an STI, or continue to experience symptoms, we recommend that you take another test two weeks after receiving the results of your first test.

Please note: If you have ordered our 7-panel STI test, your results will tell you whether the seven pathogens included in the price of your test were Detected or Not detected in your sample (chlamydia, gonorrhoea, mycoplasma genitalium, mycoplasma hominis, trichomoniasis, ureaplasma parvum and ureaplasma urealyticum).

If you are transgender and require an STI (STD) test, please select the test kit that aligns with the genitalia you have at the time of sample collection.

Customers with female genitalia are advised to use our vaginal swab test kit.  However, if you would prefer to provide a urine sample, you can contact our Customer Services team on 0333 600 1300 who will be able to assist you.

Customers with male genitalia are asked to submit a urine sample for testing.

If you are unsure about which test to order, please contact our Customer Services team who will be able to provide confidential advice on which test is best for you.

The incubation period refers to the amount of time it takes for you to show or experience symptoms from the time you were first infected.

However, many people will not experience any symptoms when infected with an STI, which means that regular STI testing is important.

Every STI has a different incubation period, depending on which STI you have.

Incubation periods can vary from as little as one day to months or even years, depending on when the body begins to produce antibodies and show symptoms.

Below are the incubation periods of some of the most common STIs (previously referred to as STDs) that we test for at AlphaBiolabs:

STI/STD Incubation period
Gonorrhoea 1-14 days
Herpes (genital/oral) 2-12 days
Trichomoniasis 5-28 days
Chlamydia 7-21 days
Hepatitis C 2-26 weeks
HIV 2-4 weeks
Syphilis 3 weeks – 20 years (type dependent)

Explore our full range of STI/STD tests

Full confidentiality is maintained throughout the testing process and when providing you with your results.

However, it is important to note that in the interests of public health and safety, AlphaBiolabs is required to report certain ‘clinically significant’ core organisms to Public Health England if they are detected within your sample.

These organisms include chlamydia trachomatis, mycoplasma genitalium, neisseria gonorrhoea and trichomonas vaginalis.

For this reason, we do ask for limited personal information from individuals submitting their samples for STI testing.

Reports made to Public Health England include the individual’s full name, date of birth, gender, ethnicity, and postcode.

Yes, you can take a 7-panel STI test whether you are symptomatic (experiencing symptoms) or asymptomatic (not experiencing symptoms).

If you do not have any symptoms, we recommend that you take an STI test no sooner than two weeks after having unprotected sex.

If you collect your sample too soon, the results of your test may not be as accurate. This is because each STI has a different window period – the time it takes from when you were first infected to when an STI can be detected in your sample – meaning that an infection may not be detected if a test is done too early.

However, if you have started to experience symptoms, you can test immediately.

If you have no symptoms, carry out the test two weeks after having sex.

Other tests that you can take even if you do not have symptoms include our Chlamydia & Gonorrhoea testHIV testHIV & Syphilis test, and our Syphilis, Hepatitis C & HIV test.

You can order one of these tests here.

Yes, you can take an STI (STD) when you’re on your period and still receive a conclusive result.

However, we recommend waiting until your period becomes lighter or you have stopped bleeding before taking a test. This will ensure a more accurate test result.

Yes, you can take an STI (STD) test when you’re pregnant.

If you are expecting a baby and you are experiencing symptoms that could indicate you have an STI, it’s especially important to get a test before the baby is born.

This is because certain STIs, including chlamydia and gonorrhoea, can be passed to the baby during delivery.

When an STI test is performed during pregnancy, a swab is inserted into the lower part of the vagina. This will not harm the baby in any way, and your test result will be just as conclusive as if you weren’t pregnant.

You partner does not have to take an STI test just because you have decided to take one.

However, if your results show that an infection has been detected, you should let your partner know so that they can also arrange to be tested.

We strongly advise that you get an STI test if an infection has been detected in your partner’s sample.

If you have received your results and an STI (previously referred to as STD) has been detected, we recommend that you contact your GP or visit your local sexual health clinic for further guidance and treatment options.

You should also abstain from sexual contact, to avoid passing the infection(s) on to other people.

Order your 7-panel STI test from our award-winning laboratory

Order Now

Related Products…